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Summer Intensive Courses for High School Students

Eugene School District 4J’s new summer intensive program provides incoming 9–12 grade students an opportunity to extend their learning into the summer months. The one- to two-week online courses are led by 4J teachers and designed to engage students in innovative learning that includes meaningful experiences outside of a traditional classroom setting.

Course offerings will explore exciting and timely topics of global and national importance, and include cultural exploration and culturally diverse themes, as well as the arts and sciences. Most of the courses offer credit upon successful completion.

Courses run Monday–Friday on the dates and times listed below unless otherwise noted. So we have enough space for all those interested, students are limited to one course. We will make an announcement in mid-July about any courses open for a second enrollment.

If your student needs a loaner device or help with internet access, please indicate that on the registration form. We can help!

Questions? Please email Ed Mendelssohn, e_mendelssohn@4j.lane.edu.

Course Grades
(2020–21)
Dates (M–F)
Times

 Link
Advanced Physics: Back and Forth and in Circles (AP/IB Readiness) 11–12 enrollment closed 1–3 p.m.
Beekeeping Basics* 9–12 Option 1: enrollment closed
Option 2: enrollment closed
9 a.m.–12 p.m.
Buddhism & Daoism 101* 10–12 enrollment closed 9:30–10:30 a.m.
Critical Analysis and Race in America (College Readiness)* 11–12 enrollment closed 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m
Decision Quality* 9–12 Aug. 10–14           (waitlist) 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
Digital Media Marketing* 9–12 Option 1: enrollment closed
Option 2: Aug. 10–14
flexible
Equity, Leadership & Action* 9–12 enrollment closed 9 a.m.–12 p.m.
Exploring Native Art & Culture* 9–12 enrollment closed 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Infectious Disease & You* 10–12 enrollment closed 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
Mindfulness 9 Option 1: enrollment closed
Option 2: cancelled
11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Music Theory* 11–12 enrollment closed 9 a.m.–12 p.m
Nature of Light: Particles, Waves & Exoplanets* 10–12 enrollment closed 9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.
Stop Motion Animation* 9–12 Option 1: enrollment closed
Option 2: Aug. 10–14
9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Symbolism & Theme in Performance and Art (College Readiness)* 9–12 enrollment closed 9 a.m.–12 p.m.
Watercolor Painting* 9–12 Option 1enrollment closed
Option 2: enrollment closed
9 a.m.–12 p.m.

1–4 p.m.

*Credit available, see course description for details.

Course Information

Advanced Physics: Back and Forth and in Circles (AP/IB readiness)                         Enrollment closed                                                                          Teacher: Christopher Doscher
Entering grades 11–12
July 27–August 7
1–3 p.m.
Not for credit

The course is an enrichment of skills obtained in measurement and uncertainty while developing new experience in periodic, simple harmonic and rotational motion that was not available due to the school closure in spring. It should be valuable to both first- and second-year physics students, although rising second-year students will benefit particularly in terms of exposure to topics missed. This course is not intended to supplant regular school year instruction, but to provide students with physics experience and skill-set development to maintain their academic progress. Ultimately, the course intends to support students both preparing for an internal assessment and/or end-of-course examination.  All supplies will be provided.

Maximum enrollment: 15 students


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Beekeeping Basics                                                                               Enrollment closed
Teacher: Lynn Hellwege
Entering grades 9–12
Option 1:  July 20- 24
Option 2:  August 3–7
9 a.m.–12 p.m
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This course is an introduction to honeybees and the basics of beekeeping. This will be both a theoretical and hands-on experience in beekeeping via virtual live-streaming hive inspections as well as building your own Langstroth beehive. There will be aspects of bee biology, ecology, agriculture, pollination, genetics, hive management, woodworking, and many business aspects of honeybees, pollination and agriculture. If there is enough demand, two more courses may be added in August.

This course is for six hours each day.  Students in this course will meet daily online from 9 a.m.–noon on Zoom. They will then have independent project time from noon–3 p.m. to build and decorate their own woodenware for a Langstroth bee hive.   The instructor will be available for questions during that time on Zoom.

Maximum enrollment: 15 students (sign up for just one session)


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Buddhism and Daoism 101                                                         Enrollment Closed                                                                                                                                  Teacher: Daniel Gallo
Entering grades 10–12
July 20–31
9:30–10:30 a.m.
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This course will explore some of the basic ideas of Buddhism and Daoism—two religions of South and East Asia that have had great influence on global thought. The primary focus of the two-week course will be on exploring philosophical ideas about life, the nature of suffering, truth, emptiness, interconnection, learning and nature. We will establish a basic context for the ideas and explore how they might impact our lives.

Maximum enrollment: 20 students


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Critical Analysis and Race in America (College Readiness)                                            Enrollment closed
Teacher: Mike Washburn
Entering grades 11–12

July 20–August 3
Zoom course: 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m., Monday–Thursday
Collaborative study groups: 10:30–11 a.m., Tuesday and Thursday
Office hours: 9:30–10:30 a.m., Monday–Friday
Credit: 0.5 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This class will focus on learning how to read, write and think critically at the college level. Students will begin by learning how to break down a writing prompt. What is the prompt asking students to write about? How should students organize their thoughts around short-answer and essay questions? Next, they will learn how to take good notes while reading a text and how to integrate those notes into their writing. The texts students will examine will be centered around racial injustice throughout United States history. Students will begin by examining the Declaration Of Independence and read the writings of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson on the issue of slavery. With that context, students will do an in-depth analysis on essays written for the 1619 Project that looked at racial injustices and race relations from the perspective of influential Black writers. The essays look at the many different aspects of race relations from generational, historical, societal and current events. The last part of the class will focus on racial issues in current events. Students will examine current issues such as police reform, school to prison, the future of nation’s relics and discuss the important question of where our society goes from here.

Students will participate in study groups each week where they can work together to formulate responses to the writing prompts, learning how to work in a group and how to ask critical questions. We will also do virtual Socratic Seminars where we discuss topics as a group. The formative assessment for this class will be in two parts: a five-page paper and a two- to three-minute in-class presentation (on Flipgrid) on any current issue of the student’s choice. Both parts can be on the same issue or two separate ones.


Maximum enrollment: 25 students


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Decision Quality    (waitlist)
Teacher: Ed Mendelssohn
Entering grades 9–12
August 10–14
10–11 a.m.
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This course is predicated on the belief, “Better decisions lead to better lives.” This course will introduce students to a process for making quality decisions, invite them to practice the different elements of a quality decision, and ultimately ask them to present a decision of consequence and the rationale used to come to that decision. As they progress through the videos, demonstrations and activities introducing the six elements of a quality-decision and common-decision traps, students will incorporate their new knowledge into their presentations. Students will use Zoom for instruction of new content and a review of material and activities from the previous day.  Students will complete and submit the learning activities in Google Classroom independently.

Register
Maximum enrollment: 30 students


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Digital Media Marketing   
Teacher: Les Phillipo
Entering grades 9–12
Option 1: Enrollment Closed
Option 2: Aug. 10–14   Enrollment Open
Times: Student’s choice. This is an asynchronous course (not taught live).
Google Classroom with Zoom support
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

Digital media is a essential component of marketing in today’s businesses and nonprofit organizations. The digital media industry is changing rapidly and transforming the way businesses connect and communicate with their customers. The number of digital marketing platforms, their strengths, weaknesses and diversity of delivery make digital marketing an exciting opportunity. This course examines digital marketing, implementation considerations, social media influencers and ethics.

Register
Maximum enrollment: 25 students


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Equity, Leadership, & Action                                                                                                         Enrollment closed
Teacher: Drew White
Entering grades 9–12
July 20–31
Zoom course: 9 a.m.–12 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Office hours: 8–10 a.m on Tuesday and Thursday
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

Charged with self-discovery, students will evaluate the diversity within themselves and develop a personal profile of unique individual traits and identity. Through this exploration of diversity, students will utilize leadership and team building to develop an equitable lens as it pertains to the historical record and modern day activism. By evaluating the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, students will choose a civil rights movement of their own to explore, such as Women’s Suffrage in the 1910s, the Gay Liberation Movement and Disability Rights Movement in the 1970s, and the Immigration Rights Movement that began in the early 2000s, and develop foundational knowledge about minority activism in the United States. Using this knowledge, students will create an action plan to execute the following school year to raise awareness of minority populations within their community.

Maximum enrollment: 30 students


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Exploring Native Art & Culture                                                                                                       Enrollment closed
Teachers: Brenda Brainard and Linda Smart
Entering grades 9–12
July 27–August 7
Online course: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Supported independent work: 1–3:30 p.m.
Credit: 0.50 HS credit for for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This course will focus on totem pole design and Oregon Indians and their history. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Pacific Northwest totem poles and then design a totem image on local wood for themselves. Students will keep the design and artwork that they complete. Oregon Indians, including historic and contemporary tribes and the issues they face, also will be shared. Students will have the opportunity to learn about local history and appreciate Oregon’s unique experiences with its Indian tribes.


Maximum enrollment: 15 students


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Infectious Disease and You                                                      Enrollment Closed
Teacher: Julia Harvey
Entering grades 10–12
August 3–7
10 a.m.–1 p.m.
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

Most people on Earth experience at least one episode of an infectious disease every year. Although the majority recover, hundreds of millions suffer severe or long-term health effects as a direct result of an infection, and around 10 million people lose their lives. On a worldwide scale, infectious diseases account for 26% of all deaths. Infectious diseases are unique in their potential for explosive global impacts as the United States and other countries are experiencing with the coronavirus pandemic. This course addresses important infectious diseases such as influenza, COVID-19, West Nile virus, Zika, malaria, dengue, filariasis and MRSA. Students will investigate and analyze pathogen characteristics, disease outbreaks, case studies, diagnoses, methods of transmission, the immune response, and vaccine effectiveness. This course will integrate biology, math and history as students survey diseases through time.

Maximum enrollment: 30 students


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Mindfulness                                                                                       Enrollment closed                                                                                                                     Teacher: Daniel Gallo
Option 1: July 20 – 24
Option 2: CANCELLED
11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Not for credit

Students will participate in readings, reflections and mindfulness activities daily and provide feedback on the development of the curriculum. The course will provide students with lessons in constructing positive mental health and working toward stress and anxiety reduction.

Maximum enrollment: 20 students per session; students limited to one session


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Music Theory                                                                                                                                          Enrollment closed
Teacher: Megan Perdue
Entering grades 11–12
July 27–August 7
9 a.m.–noon
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Western music theory followed by their application to melody, harmony, and rhythm through analysis and composition. Emphasis is on fluency of key signatures, scales, rhythm, intervals, and triads and 7th chords. Additionally, students will have an introduction to aural skills through interval identification and melodic and rhythmic dictation. Instruction will be delivered through online instruction with individual support provided through virtual office hours and meetings.

Maximum enrollment: 25 students


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Nature of Light: Particles, Waves, and Exoplanets                                                           Enrollment closed
Teacher: Christopher Doscher
Entering grades 10–12
July 27–August 7
9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Credit: 0.50 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This course offers a survey of classic geometric optics and light behavior with a lens (pun intended) on the habitability characteristics of other planets. Students will conduct classic experiments investigating the wave-particle duality of light while addressing the guiding question: How can we use the behavior of light to understand the most important characteristics of an inhabitable planet? Students will have the opportunity to engage in dialogue about the physical science of light behavior and the social scientific ramifications of the human search for other habitable worlds.
Maximum enrollment: 20 students


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Stop Motion Animation
Teacher: Holly Albone
Entering grades 9–12
Option 1: Aug. 3–7 Enrollment Closed
Option 2: Aug. 10–14   Enrollment Open
9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

This course will take students through a variety of experiences and exposures to art, storytelling, filmmaking and animation through learning about and creating stop motion animations using the iMotion app on an iPad. Students will learn to create animations in a variety of ways, including using paper, modeling clay, drawings and objects. They will work individually and/or in small groups to create storyboards and develop characters, build sets, and create their animations. Through this process, they will learn how to sculpt characters and design sets. Students will also learn simple filmmaking and story development techniques by watching and analyzing clips from stop motion animations of different genres and time periods. They will be encouraged to create films that highlight personal knowledge and experiences that promote social justice and cultural competency. They will share their videos online and get feedback from a diverse audience, in addition to their peers and classmates.

Register
Maximum enrollment: 20 students


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Symbolism & Theme in Performance and Art                                                     Enrollment closed                                                                                       Teacher: Jenn Scott
Entering grades 9–12
July  20–August 7
9 a.m.–12 p.m.
Credit: 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project

Students will be introduced to the concepts of symbolism, various forms of figurative language and theme. Students will analyze selected poems, visual art and performance art from diverse perspectives in order to analyze the use of symbolism and how that symbolism contributes to theme. Instruction will be delivered through Google Classroom. Students will participate in whole and small-group discussion via Zoom meetings once per week. Using Google Classroom, they will comment on other students’ posts regarding various texts and visual media in order to interpret implicit and explicit meaning as conveyed by symbolism, figurative language and theme. Understanding symbolism is integral to deeper reflection on literature, art and society; this course will help all grade levels read and watch various texts and mediums and allow them to utilize their own backgrounds and experiences in order to interpret art in its various forms. Symbolism will be drawn from other various elements, including ancient cave art, dreams, music videos, protest art and sculpture.

Maximum enrollment: 30 students


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Watercolor Painting                                                                                 Enrollment closed
Teacher: Kendra Brott
July 20–31
Option 1: July 20 – 31
Option 2: July 27–31, 1–4 p.m.
Grades 9–12
Credit: Option 1 offers 0.25 HS credit for full participation and successful completion of coursework, including the capstone project. Option 2 is not for credit and is a modified version of the initial course.

Topics covered:
• Introduction to materials (paper types, how watercolors are different then acrylics/latex/oil)
• How to use certain types of watercolor paint brushes (how, why, proper use)
• What is watercolor: introduce artists and examples
• Color wheels
• Monoprintings (find leaves, color wheel, make prints)
• Cloud paintings
• Bitty paintings: multiple 4×4 paintings of in detail done quickly
• Grid painting (perspective)
• Plein Air painting
• Nature paintings
• Painting from a photograph/picture using grid techniques
• Salt paintings with watercolor

Most supplies will be provided. Families are asked to provide a mobile solid work surface, masking tape, and two pencils and erasers.

Maximum enrollment: 25 students